Kia ora whānau, we’ve been quiet over the last few months but we are quietly developing our whānau links and learning about whakapapa, waiata, te reo, tikanga, and the arts of Te Whare Pora.

Uncle Terry Ryan recently came up for a visit and as always he shared a wealth of knowledge with us and connected up whānau who hadn’t known they were related. Thank you Uncle Terry, we love your visits, they always makes us feel so much more connected with home and whānau.

Also a big thank you to Phillipa Hakopa who has been leading us in waiata. Phillipa has contributed such an amazing positive energy to our rōpū and has inspired us with her love of waiata and teaching.

A growing number of Ngāi Tahu are living in the North Waikato under the korowai of Waikato Tainui, and we are lucky to be able to be part of wānanga and noho that are held here to teach raranga and whatu kākahu.

A weekly raranga class runs throughout the year and monthly noho are held at Tūrangawaewae. These are open to whānau interested in joining, so if you are keen to get involved next year contact us at
[email protected]

To all our whānau, ngā mihi o te Kirihimete – we look forward to connecting over the summer and the New Year. The Kāi Tahu ki Waikato Taurahere rōpū kōmiti.

Uncle Terry and whānau during the whakapapa wānanga at Ngāruawāhia Community House.

Uncle Terry and whānau during the whakapapa wānanga at Ngāruawāhia Community House.

Lyn Carter finishing a beautiful weka kākahu at Tūrangawaewae Marae.

Lyn Carter finishing a beautiful weka kākahu at Tūrangawaewae Marae.

Marama Olsen preps for her first kete at the Ngāruawāhia Art Centre raranga rōpū.

Marama Olsen preps for her first kete at the Ngāruawāhia Art Centre raranga rōpū.

Jane Stevens working on her whānau kākahu at Tūrangawaewae Marae.

Jane Stevens working on her whānau kākahu at Tūrangawaewae Marae.